What do UC political clubs think about the recent elections?

Photo courtesy of Ursinus Communications Borough Council President Marion McKinney, Alana Lorraine ’18 and Ursinus Director of Disability Services Shammah Bermudez voting last Tuesday.

Sienna Coleman

sicoleman@ursinus.edu

 

“The Grizzly” hopes that you went out to vote last Tuesday for the 2018 midterm elections! No matter who you voted for, every single vote should count.

“The Grizzly” asked the po- litical organizations on campus, the Ursinus College Democrats, the College Republicans and the Young Americans for Lib- erty, to share their reactions to the election results with us.

The Young Americans for Liberty declined to answer.

The UC Democrats: “The UC Democrats are thrilled about the results of the 2018 midterms. All statewide Democratic candidates and local candidates won their race. In other words, Democratic candidates on the ballot in Collegeville all won their race. On a national level, we are happy about the Democrats taking control of the House. We are, of course, saddened to hear about the losing of major races in Texas, Georgia, and Florida, but we are not caught off guard. We are looking forward to the end of the Trump administration’s monopoly on American policy making.”

The College Republicans: “On campus prior to the election, it was a bit nerve-wrack- ing because there is a social push to participate in the “blue wave.” There are not many [vocal] student Republicans on campus, so finding people with similar views to discuss the election with was often challenging. I am very pleased to see that so many people turned out to vote in the election. I am also pleased with the results of the election within my district, and hopefully our newly elected officials will be able to work with each other, no matter which party they come from. After all, no matter if we are Democrat or Republican, we are all people, and we can work together to fix problems within our government and society.”

“The Grizzly” would like to thank all of the students who went out to the polls, no matter how they voted, for getting involved in their democracy.